The basic setup for an IP range defines a local network that consists of your range and your router, then routes between that and the wider Internet.

Your range will be split into various types of IP address. Two are allocated as part of the CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) system which will be the first address (the network address), that defines the range, and the last (the broadcast address), which is used for multicasting. One further address will be allocated to your router, the remainder can be used however you require.

The specifics differ slightly depending on your router and whether you have an independent framed WAN IP or inline WAN IP.

If you have an inline WAN IP 

The public IP address of your router is assigned from within your range.

Your router will need to be configured in a half-bridge mode with the internal and external interfaces having the same address (most routers will default to a half-bridge automatically when configured in this way). The WAN interface of the router should be configured to acquire its settings automatically - it will pick up the WAN IP, the default gateway to which it has connected, the subnet mask 255.255.255.255 and the current DNS servers.

The LAN IP of the router should be configured so that it is also the WAN IP and the subnet mask should match your range (255.255.255.248 for a range of 8 IPs, 255.255.255.252 for a range of 4 IPs).

Finally NAT (Network Address Translation) should be disabled on the router. The router needs to just route, not hide the internal IPs behind a translation.

Your internal devices then can be allocated from the remaining IP addresses. They should use the same subnet as the LAN side of the router, the routers IP as their default gateway and again the routers IP as their DNS server.

If you have a framed WAN IP 

The public IP address of your router is a single IP, we then route this IP to your router which routes it to the various devices on your internal network.

The WAN interface of the router should be configured to acquire it's settings automatically - it will pick up the Framed IP, the default gateway to which it has connected, the subnet mask 255.255.255.255 and the current DNS servers.

The LAN IP of the router should be configured with one of the free IPs from your range (generally we suggest the 2nd) and the subnet mask should match your range (255.255.255.248 for a range of 8 IPs, 255.255.255.252 for a range of 4 IPs).

Finally NAT (Network Address Translation) should be disabled on the router. The router needs to just route, not hide the internal IPs behind a translation.

Your internal devices then can be allocated from the remaining IP addresses. They should use the same subnet as the LAN side of the router, the routers IP as their default gateway and again the routers IP as their DNS server.

There are more complex setups available including multi-nat where the router serves both the range and a NAT enabled private subnet or many:many NAT where the router will receive all IPs within your range and translate them to private IPs however these require a more sophisticated router and are more complicated to setup.

Where appropriate consult your Network Administrator to discuss your requirements and the configuration of your network and equipment.